Top 15 Animals with Strongest Bites In The World. (and runner-ups)

One of the most astonishing physical characteristics that wild creatures bring to bear in their struggle for existence is their ability to simply bite down on their prey with great force. Naturally, the strongest jaws in nature are frequently found in top predators that occupy the highest positions in the food chain, and obtaining accurate measurements of their bite power can be a dangerous endeavor in and of itself.

What is a Bite?

One of the most astonishing physical characteristics that wild creatures bring to bear in their struggle for existence is their ability to simply bite down on their prey with great force. Naturally, the strongest jaws in nature are frequently found in top predators that occupy the highest positions in the food chain, and obtaining accurate measurements of their bite power can be a dangerous endeavor in and of itself.

However, the size of an animal’s meal also has an impact on the power with which it bites, which is mostly determined by its jaw muscles, jawbone, and tooth surface area. Given that muscle force is proportional to how far it is stretched, the bite force of an animal is proportional to the size of the object it is biting. Scientists have developed computer models based on several X-ray scans of shark skulls obtained by a computerized tomography scanner to predict the biting power of a great white shark. 

Which Unit is used to represent the Power of a Bite?

Bite pressure is calculated in pounds per square inch which are abbreviated as (psi). More precisely, it is pound-force per square inch, since it represents the pressure exerted by a one-pound force applied to a one-square-inch surface area or 6.5 square centimeters. In other words, the amount of pressure that a predator applies on its food or unfortunate victim.

Examples of Animals with Strongest Bites

1: Orcas

  • Scientific name: Orcinus orca
  • Type of animal: Mammals
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 19000 PSI

The orca, often known as the killer whale, is a toothed whale that is a member of the marine dolphin family, of which it is the most massive member. It may be distinguished by its body, which is patterned in black and white.

The biting force of a killer whale may theoretically reach 19,000 pounds per square inch. They are so large that they may weigh up to six tons and measure thirty feet in length, which is mostly owing to their sheer size. Because the majority of the data is based on simulations, theory, and captive whale research, it did not deserve to be included on the list.

2: Nile crocodile

  • Scientific name: Crocodylus niloticus
  • Type of animal: Reptile
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 5000 PSI

An African freshwater crocodile that is found in 26 different nations, the Nile crocodile is a huge crocodile that is endemic to freshwater ecosystems in Africa. It is extensively spread throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, with the majority of its populations concentrated in the central, eastern, and southern portions of the continent. It may be found in a variety of aquatic habitats, including lakes, rivers, swamps, and marshlands, among other places.

However, even though they are smaller in size than saltwater crocodiles, Nile crocodiles rank first in the world when it comes to having the strongest bite. They are aggressive and fiercely territorial, and they make excellent use of their formidable bite. Nile crocodiles will take down any prey that comes within striking distance of the water, despite the fact that their primary diet consists primarily of fish.

3: Great White Shark

  • Scientific name: Cacharodon carcharias
  • Type of animal: Fish
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 4000 PSI

It will be far more difficult to come up with the necessary data if the great white shark bite force is not measured with the same precision as that utilized in the crocodile study. Researchers were able to use sophisticated x-rays to conclusively determine that a shark reaching 21 feet would register around 4,000 PSI, according to their findings. Despite weighing between 4,000 and 7,000 pounds on average, such force pales in contrast to the force created by our top-ranked animal when pound-for-pound strength is taken into consideration.

4: Saltwater Crocodile

  • Scientific name: Crocodylus porosus
  • Type of animal: Reptile
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 3700 PSI

When a saltwater crocodile uses a death roll, the biting force of the bite is employed to grip onto the prey. This reptile is the world’s largest (living) reptile by length. Males may grow to reach up to 7m in length and weigh over 1,000kg, while females are significantly smaller and weigh around 500kg. They ambush their victims by lurking along the water’s edge and lunging at them with great force. 

Saltwater crocodiles are one of the most deadly animals on the planet, claiming the lives of between 3,000 and 5,000 people each year, depending on their size. A 17-foot crocodile with a biting force of 3,700 PSI, as measured in a controlled setting by a renowned scientist, is required to win the gold medal in this category. By extrapolating from this data, the same scientist was able to calculate that prehistoric crocodiles measuring 40 feet would have a biting force of 23,000 pounds per square inch (PSI).

5: American alligator

Scientific name Alligator mississippiensis

Type of animal          Reptile

Diet Carnivores

Bite Power (PSI)  2125 PSI

The American alligator is a giant crocodile reptile that is endemic to the Southeastern United States. The American alligator is sometimes referred to as a gator or common alligator because of its size and appearance. Alligators are opportunistic predators who will lie in wait for the simplest prey to come along. They will eat anything, including snakes, fish, and turtles, as well as mammals and amphibians, and even insects. Researchers from Florida State University discovered that an alligator’s bite can raise a compact vehicle by several hundred pounds.

6: Walrus

  • Scientific name: Odobenus rosmarus
  • Type of animal: Mammal
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 1850 PSI

The faty-looking and long-tusked walrus may be seen most commonly in the Arctic Circle, where they can be observed lying on the ice with hundreds of other walruses. This species of a marine mammal is highly friendly, with members of the group frequently shouting and snorting at one another, yet they may become hostile during mating season.

Despite their comical appearance, the walruses’ biting force is nothing to be laughed at. These animals prey on more than just shellfish, and they are known to prey on seals as well. In addition, they are capable of engaging in combat with polar bears, because of their powerful jaw and massive tusks.

7: Hippopotamus

  • Scientific name :Hippopotamus amphibius
  • Type of animal: Mammal
  • Diet: Herbivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 1800 PSI

In Africa, the hippopotamus, often known as the hippo, or river hippopotamus, is an ungulate that is a big semi-aquatic mammal that is mostly herbivorous and is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. It is one of just two species of the Hippopotamidae family that are still alive today. A hippopotamus has the widest mouth and the biggest teeth of any land animal. Its canine teeth are approximately 71cm in length and are constantly expanding in length. The hippopotamus has the world’s biggest canine tooth, measuring a massive 122cm in length.

8: Jaguar

  • Scientific name: Panthera onca
  • Type of animal: Mammal
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI):1500 PSI

The jaguar is a huge cat species that is the only extant member of the genus Panthera that is endemic to the Americas. It is the largest living member of the Panthera family. It is the biggest cat species in the Americas, and the third largest in the world, with a body length of up to 6 feet and a mass of up to 96 kg. It is also the most dangerous.

Jaguar bite power is employed for a variety of tasks, including cutting through armored crocodile skin, breaking turtle and tortoise shells, and crushing bone. Jaguars are opportunistic hunters that will prey on almost anything if the opportunity presents itself. They are capable of taking down creatures that are four times their own weight with a single hard bite to the back of the head.

9: Bull shark

  • Scientific name: Carcharhinus leucas
  • Type of animal: Fish
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 1350 PSI

In Africa, the bull shark is often referred to as the “Zambezi shark.” Generally found in warm, shallow waters around coastlines and in rivers all throughout the world. In addition to its aggressive attitude, it is found in warm, shallow brackish and freshwater systems, such as estuaries and rivers, where it may do significant damage.

It is noted that a bull shark has up to 350 teeth at a time, which is more than any other species of shark. A shark’s mouth functions similarly to a conveyor belt: once an old tooth close to the edge of the jaw is lost, a tooth from the row behind it travels forward to take its place in the mouth. The result is that they can grow up to 50,000 teeth in their lifetime! It’s no surprise that shark teeth appear often in the fossil record.

10: Gorilla

  • Scientific name: Gorilla gorilla
  • Type of animal: Mammal
  • Diet Herbivores
  • Bite Power (PSI)  1300 PSI

Gorillas are ground-dwelling giant apes that live in the tropical forests of Africa. They are the world’s largest living primate. The genus Gorilla is split into two species: the eastern gorilla and the western gorilla, as well as four or five subspecies of each of these species. In fact, the vast neck and jaw muscles that allow the gorilla to have one of the greatest bite power of any primate in the world. They are herbivores, to be sure, but their diet consists mostly of harder items than bananas: the gorilla’s powerful teeth enable him to chew through heavy shoots, bark, nuts, tubers, and other fibrous foods with ease. The long, pointed canines found on adult males are primarily for show and are not functional.

11: Polar Bear

  • Scientific name :Ursus maritimus
  • Type of animal: Mammal
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 1200 PSI

Although the polar bear is the biggest bear species in North America, it is also considered to be the strongest in terms of its ability to bite with great force. The polar bear bites seal with an estimated biting power of 1,200 PSI, according to experts. When food is sparse, they will also eat whale corpses, fish, and any berries that they can locate to supplement their diet.

The polar bear consumes far less vegetation than its other cousins, partly as a result of the harsh arctic settings in which it lives. Because they want to retain quite as much heat from the sun as possible, their white fur is used to hide skin that is actually black. Polar bears may grow to reach 1,200 pounds and seven feet tall, and they can stand on their hind legs. However, even with their massive size, the webbed paws of the polar bear allow them to swim quite well.

12: Grizzly bear

  • Scientific name: Ursus arctos horribilis
  • Type of animal: Mammal
  • Diet: Omnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 1160 PSI

The grizzly bear is a giant mammal that lives in North America. This apex predator has a jaw force of about half a tone and a crushing force of 1160 PSI, making it the most powerful predator on the planet. Despite this astounding number, the grizzly bear does not rely only on its physical strength to survive. In its natural habitat of North America, this omnivore gets the majority of its nutrition from plants like nuts. It also eats berries and other fruits and vegetables. It is true that the grizzly bear uses its power to bring down prey that ranges in size from mice to moose and everything in between.

13: Hyena

  • Scientific name: Crocuta crocuta
  • Type of animal: Mammal
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 1100 PSI

The spotted hyena is also a dangerous predator with a biting force of 1,100 PSI, which is over twice the strength of the lion, which is their main predator on the African grasslands. It is the biggest member of the hyena family, measuring between three and four feet in length including the tail. These animals may weigh between 100 and 200 pounds, depending on their size.

Despite the fact that they resemble dogs in look, they are more likely to be related to cats and civets than to dogs. Spotted hyenas hunt in groups known as clans, which can contain as many as 80 individuals. In these big groupings, they are able to take down prey and then rejoice by barking their unique laughing bark. They utilize the force of their bite to fracture bones and hooves, and they swallow practically every single portion of their victim, allowing no part of it to be wasted in the process.

14: Bengal Tiger

  • Scientific name: Panthera tigris tigris
  • Type of animal: Mammal
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 1150 PSI

Bengal tigers are native to India, therefore they are sometimes referred to as Indian tigers. They are the most common tiger species, accounting for over half of all wild tigers. It has taken hundreds of years for them to establish themselves as a vital element of Indian history and legend. Bengal tigers are known for having the largest canine teeth of about 2.5 to 3 inches, and they have the biting force to back it up, exerting more than a thousand pounds-per-square-inch of pressure nearly twice as much bite force than the king of the jungle, the tiger of the jungle.

15: Lion

  • Scientific name: Panthera leo
  • Type of animal: Mammal
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 650 PSI

Lions comprise a huge massive muscular body in the cat family and they are only second in size to tigers. The lions emit roars that can be heard up to five miles away. Lions have a bite force of just 650 PSI, which is not much stronger than the English mastiff, which is the hardest-biting domestic dog in the world (550 PSI). However, because lions are sociable creatures who hunt in packs and swallow their prey where it falls, it is possible that their individual jaw strength will be reduced.

16: Black piranha

  • Scientific name: Serrasalmus rhombeus
  • Type of animal: Fish
  • Diet: Carnivores
  • Bite Power (PSI): 464 PSI

The black piranha is not having so much worth in the food market because it is a little fish that grows to be roughly 20 inches in length. Although they are little in stature, they have an amazing biting force of over 450 PSI, which is disproportionate to their size. This astonishing power, along with their razor-sharp teeth, distinguishes them as the fish with the hardest bite and one of the deadliest captures you’ll ever come across.

17: Tasmanian devil

Scientific name Sarcophilus harrisii

Type of animal          Mammal

Diet Carnivores

Bite Power (PSI)  200 PSI

It is a carnivorous marsupial of the family Dasyuridae, and it is native to Tasmania. Until recently, it was only found on the island of Tasmania, but it has now been successfully reintroduced to the state of New South Wales on the Australian mainland, where it has established a tiny breeding population. When the size of the animal is taken into consideration, Tasmanian devils are said to have the greatest biting force of any mammal. They are barely 9.07 kg in weight, yet when they bite, they can produce 200 psi of pressure.

Conclusion

Biting something by using the jaw and teeth is a basic function of predatory animals which is used in defense, eating, capturing, chewing, and crushing the food materials. All of the animals which are discussed above show a high power bite capability which is used by these organisms during aggressive behaviors.